What is the Pot Project?

Not everyone has a problem with pot. Just like a wine or beer or a cocktail without fear, pot lives in that place where many will use with no ill effects while others get sick from it. The voices for, and against pot, have been noisy and distracting for those wanting the truth. For those for whom pot is a problem, it is a real problem. Those prone to addictive behavior are more likely to have the bad from pot – not the good. Some might smoke or vape and it’s no big deal; it soothes and mellows. Others will smoke it and find they struggle with negative impact on the brain – and life. So while we won’t all agree on everything, there are certain things that every family should know about pot: it’s a drug period, like alcohol, that many who use it will struggle with it.

Pot dependency can interrupt the flow of life and family and jobs. With more US states moving to legalization, admit it: POT IS HOT.

We don’t judge or nudge, or comment on, the nation’s laws around pot and products that have pot’s active ingredient – THC – in them.

We are dedicated to one goal: inform, inspire, unite, and help those seeking some wisdom around marijuana use. To the facts, we remain committed.

THE POT PROJECT’S MISSION IS TO HIGHLIGHT 5 FUNDAMENTAL CANNABIS FACTS

OUR PANEL OF EXPERTS DISAGREE ON MANY POINTS, BUT ON THESE 5 FUNDAMENTALS WE AGREE:

1.  1 in 5 who start smoking pot as a teen will become sick from it.

2.  While pot users are not known to overdose, many will be injured or die from related illnesses and events.

3.  Many who use pot medicinally or recreationally will suffer no negative impacts.

4.  THC-infused edibles pose real risks to the kids and pets in the home, car and at work.

5.  The anxiety many users smoke to relieve is exacerbated in those prone to dependency as THC levels have spiked due to high-tech tinkering.

THE ABC's OF POT + WHATNOT

Because We Care

Noteworthy News

Obama Says Pot Legalization Shouldn't Be Young People's 'Biggest Priority'

President Barack Obama warned young Americans not to focus on legalizing pot at the expense of more important issues like war and peace, climate change and the economy.

“It shouldn’t be young people’s biggest priority,” Obama said in an interview with Vice News‘ Shane Smith, who said legalization of marijuana would be a vital part of the president’s legacy.

“So let’s put it in perspective, young people, I understand this is important to you but you should be thinking about climate change, the economy, jobs, war and peace, maybe way at the bottom you should be thinking about marijuana,” Obama said in the interview, which aired on Monday.

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Senate Bill May Answer a Decades-Old Request

On March 10, 2015, three U.S. Senators introduced legislation that, if enacted, could reverse federal policy established more than four decades ago. The bill would remove marijuana from Schedule I of the Controlled Substances Act — the most severely restricted of the five schedules. Senator Rand Paul (R-KY), one of the co-sponsors, said “For far too long, the government has enforced unnecessary laws that have restricted the ability of the medical community to determine the medicinal value of marijuana and have prohibited Americans from receiving essential care that will alleviate their chronic pain and suffering.”

The bill is just the latest in the long road of reform that is called “the medical marijuana movement.” It was begun in 1976 by a young college professor, and my late husband, Robert Randall. Thirty-nine years ago Randall was the only — yes, the only — recipient of medical marijuana in America. A headline at the time proclaimed Randall, “One in 213 million.”

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